Keep It 1.11: Gran Turismo Sport Expands with New Update ""

By | February 5, 2018

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If a racing video game doesn’t have enough cars in it to appeal to enthusiasts of, say, turbo PT Cruisers, Ladas, and obscure versions of the Honda Jazz, most gamers aren’t going to bother even firing it up. Luckily for those looking for more four-wheeled variety, update 1.11 for Gran Turismo Sport on PlayStation 4 launched worldwide last week and brought more cars (admittedly not a massive amount, but, hey, we’ll take it), more events for the recently added single-player GT League mode, and two new racing circuits.

New Cars

Dodge now has nine options in their showroom with this addition of the 448-hp 2002 Dodge Viper GTS, available in six colors. It’s in the N500 car category, along with the Group 3 Mustang, the Ferrari F40, and others. Ferrari fans get two more options: The 1976 Ferrari 512 BB is a beautifully detailed version of the mid-engine Berlinetta Boxer, complete with functioning radiator cooling fans; the other, a 1967 Ferrari 330 P4 race car, is one of the most expensive cars in the game at 20 million credits. Yes, this is the same model that debuted at the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona with not only a victory, but with two other Ferrari 330 P4s finishing 2nd and 3rd.

Gran Turismo Sport

The 2006 Ford GT is here and is available in a handful of different colors with optional racing stripes, but we already know most players are going to head straight to the Livery Editor to re-create the classic Gulf look. The 1966 XJ13, not to be confused with an E-type, is just Jaguar’s fourth model in the game. Lamborghini’s roster adds the 2000 Lamborghini Diablo GT—which Lambo made just 80 of—in Giallo Corona paint. It’s a welcome addition to the N600 car category, and the second most expensive in its class at 300,000 credits. Elon Musk once owned a McLaren F1, and now you can, too, as that icon can now be driven in GT Sport.

Toyota’s showroom receives three new cars, each in different categories. The 1967 Toyota 2000GT sits in the slower N200 category. The detail in the woodgrain interior trim is fantastic, as are its big, pop-up headlamps and functional fender mirrors. The ’97 Supra RZ competes in the faster N300 category alongside the Subaru WRX STI and Audi TTS. Finally, 2014’s Toyota FT-1 concept has been added with, Gran Turismo points out, specifications that are “a fictitious set created especially for Gran Turismo.” Many of the specs are vague, but in-game the FT-1 makes 486 hp at 7,000 rpm with 425.2 lb-ft of torque at 3,000 rpm. You know what, we say make it faster Toyota!

Gran Turismo Sport

Gran Turismo maker Polyphony Digital announced earlier this year that it plans 50 additional cars by March 2018. We say so far so good, but it does feel like the cars being added aren’t really anything new. The all-new Ford GT, for example, would be welcome, and the car choices almost make Gran Turismo Sport feel as if it’s aging too fast.

New Courses

Two Italian courses make their debut, one being the historic Autodromo Nazionale Monza, home of the Formula 1 Italian Grand Prix. Monza is one of the oldest tracks still used today and demands precise timing of every input, especially when racing the layout with chicanes. It’s also been added as a new location in the Scapes photo mode. The second course is a fictional circuit called Autodrome Lago Maggiore that has six different layouts. It’s no Nürburgring in terms of length, but the challenging high-speed banking can be combined with tricky esses on certain layouts and will certainly keep you alert.

GT League Events

Campaign mode will feel familiar to those who played older GT games and features single-player events, computer opponents, and ranges of difficulty. New events in each of the four leagues are available. Leagues are split based on earned in-game experience: Beginner, Amateur, Professional, and Endurance.

Gran Turismo Sport

Beginner League adds Raptor Survival, a three-race series that pits Ford F-150 SVT Raptors against each other. One of the courses featured in this series is a jump-dotted dirt track in Colorado Springs that’s pretty rad. Amateur League now has a Japanese-car-only series in the new J-Sports Meeting event. The first race of the three-race series is in Italy for some reason, but the others take place on the classic Tokyo Expressway and Suzuka Circuit. This is a great place for a trial run of any of the new Japanese cars from this update. La Festa Cavallino is new to the Professional League; it’s a three-race event for Ferraris held on the two new circuits as well as the Nürburgring Grand Prix course. The Endurance League gains a 30-lap race for Group 3 class cars at Monza. Players face 19 computer opponents in this trial, with tire wear and fuel consumption turned up to force you to consider pit strategy during the race.

Other Additions

Among the more under-appreciated parts of Gran Turismo Sport are its various manufacturer museums where you can dive deep on the history of not only the individual automakers but also relevant inventions and discoveries from science, music, computers, and literature. The Daihatsu Museum is new in this update, and we now know all about its creation of the first domestic suction gas engine in 1907.

Polyphony Digital claims that overall stability during online races has improved as well as updates to handling for cars with Dirt or Drift available in their settings. There also are the usual resolution of various glitches and bugs in the menus and during races. The days of sliding into the pits during a reverse spin to get a lap ahead of everyone during the race are over, and in a separate announcement Polyphony Digital warns that cheating like this can result in a pretty serious black flag. Gran Turismo Sport remains a work in progress—especially in terms of content—and we’re looking forward to seeing what’s being cooked up for future updates.

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